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Drugs, prostitution and the irresponsible

I was somewhat perturbed by two local radio hosts who insisted that the war on drugs was a waste of money and prostitution should be legal. The war on drugs is necessary and is about more than just a hippie smoking a joint. I doubt any recovering addict is supporting the legalization of drugs. And saving one or two families to me is more important than any amount of money.

I guess the host didn't see it that way:

Ron and Don,

After hearing your rant about how much of a waste fighting drugs and
prostitution is, I just can't bring myself to listen to your show
anymore. It's funny how people who claim the government is wasting
money on fighting crime such as drugs or prostitution generally have
zero experience in either.

Prostitution, on it's face, doesn't seem like a big deal. There is,
however, the spread of disease and the families that are ruined by
cheating and that disease. Government funded programs tend to be less
than stellar and condoms break all the time. And prostitution,
especially being a crime, generally goes hand in hand with other
crimes such as abuse and drugs.

Drugs, on the other hand, is a huge deal. Do you really think that
legalizing drugs or lack of enforcement would fix our problems? Do you
think that money we'd save wouldn't be spent on more people in rehab,
medical treatment, services for families affected by an addict and
many, many more problems stemming from legalization? Do you really
think people will suddenly stop using drugs, or do you think they
would start younger and younger, like cigarettes? For many, the first
step towards sobriety was found in "the system," and for nearly all, a
bottom had to be hit before treatment can begin and that bottom
usually starts with jail.

Addiction is not a choice and I doubt you will find a former drug
addict who claims legalizing drugs is a good idea.

I could deal with Don's ultra political correctness and annoying
tendency to go out of his way to relate to almost everyone, but Ron,
after you used your job to spout about how much of a waste of money
the war on drugs is, I can't support your show. Drugs is just not
marijuana, drugs includes heroin, crack and meth.

I think one little girl or boy saved by our war on drugs is worth
every penny and I'm sorry you don't feel the same way.

Jacob Steelsmith

And the response:

How's that war going Jacob?

Thanks for writing.

The name calling is a bit over the top.

I think you're betterthan that...

Enjoy baseball on KOMO.

d.

Obviously, this type of childish response isn't worth it, but nothing to say on topic? Really? Well, it just cements my decision to not listen to their show. There are good programs on that radio station, just not this one.

Topics: 

Comments

Jake,

I'll have a go for the spirit of debate:

Ron and Don are entertainers and gain advertisers by ruffling the feathers of the listeners. They would fade into the woodwork of AM radio if they weren't "controversial" and couldn't bring up topics that other people would disagree about. This is our freedom of speech in action; the right to be controversial, the right to disagree, change stations or turn off the radio.

I agree about the importance of supporting the family unit but disagree with big government standing in our living room telling us how to raise a family.

Also, science has proven time and time again that marijuana is not addictive, cannot be overdosed, helps pain and is completely natural. It is illegal only because of the following ignorant and racist legislation: http://blogs.salon.com/0002762/stories/2003/12/22/whyIsMarijuanaIllegal....

Alcohol, cigarettes, cocaine and opiates kill thousands of people daily and are extremely addictive. These are not natural drugs and should be illegal. These drugs, and not marijuana create victims.

Drug laws should reflect the foundations of our society and the constitutional rights we have. Part of these rights are liberty (def. the condition in which an individual has the ability to act according to his or her own will). Liberty should be a right for everyone as long as that person doesn't infringe on the rights of others. Once a person's liberty infringes another persons liberty, it should be illegal.

I agree that prostitution is morally wrong but again, should our government be telling us how to act morally? I don't think that is why our government was created. I could be wrong but our founders escaped the control of the other governments to be free.

That's all I've got! I've never heard that show but can definitely see why you're perturbed. Thanks for reading!

A response with substance! =)

"Ron and Don are entertainers and gain advertisers by ruffling the feathers of the listeners. They would fade into the woodwork of AM radio if they weren't "controversial" and couldn't bring up topics that other people would disagree about. This is our freedom of speech in action; the right to be controversial, the right to disagree, change stations or turn off the radio."

I completely agree and I now turn the radio station at certain times. To me for certain personal reasons, that is a very serious subject, to me, and it shouldn't be discussed lightly, nor should such a thoughtless stance be arbitrarily tossed on the air. The conversation I remember wasn't simply marijuana, it was drugs.

"Also, science has proven time and time again that marijuana is not addictive, cannot be overdosed, helps pain and is completely natural. It is illegal only because of the following ignorant and racist legislation [snip]"

I am aware of the original reasons marijuana, and all drugs, originally became illegal. Lest we forget the origins and original, now illicit, ingredient of Coca-Cola and many cure-all tonics, and why that ingredient, cocaine, became illegal as well, which was the same racist reasons, to scapegoat Africa Americans. The history channel has an excellent series on the subject, Hooked: Illegal Drugs and How They Got That Way. Considering most drugs were made illegal before their ill effects were realized, and for ignorant reasons, it's a poor point for the legalization of marijuana.

However, although there is no evidence that marijuana is physically addictive and the withdraw symptoms are not as severe or are non existent, after a period of time, marijuana is socially and psychologically addictive. I have had personal experience and I know, from a wide array of users and types of people, that marijuana is addictive.

"Marijuana use, in fact, is often associated with behavior that meets the criteria for substance dependence established by the American Psychiatric Association in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSMĀ­IV). Considered the standard reference for health professionals who make psychiatric diagnoses, the DSM contains information about all mental disorders for children and adults. As described in the DSM, the criteria for substance dependence include tolerance (needing more of the substance to achieve the same
effects, or diminished effect with the same amount of the substance); withdrawal symptoms; using a drug even in the presence of adverse effects; and giving up social, occupational, or recreational activities because of substance use. According to the 2002 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 4.3 million Americans were classified with dependence on or abuse of marijuana. That figure represents 1.8 percent of the total U.S. population and 60.3 percent of those classified as individuals who abuse or are dependent on illicit drugs." [http://www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov/publications/marijuana_myths_facts/myth2.pdf]

Another study done by NIDA has "demonstrated that laboratory animals will self-administer marijuana's psychoactive component, THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol), in doses equivalent to those used by humans who smoke the drug. Self-administration of drugs by animals, long considered a model of human drug-seeking behavior, is characteristic of virtually all addictive and abused drugs." ""The drug-seeking behavior in these animals was comparable in intensity to that maintained by cocaine under identical conditions, and was obtained from a range of doses comparable to those self-administered by humans smoking a single marijuana cigarette," Dr. Goldberg says. "This finding suggests that marijuana has as much potential for abuse as other drugs of abuse, such as cocaine and heroin." [http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/10/001017073204.htm]

And the long term effects of marijuana use are now being revealed in several studies, including a very recent Australian study showing "long-term, heavy cannabis use causes brain damage that is equivalent to mild-traumatic brain injury or premature ageing."

"It found the parts of their brains that regulate memory and emotion, the hippocampus and the amygdala, were significantly smaller than those of non-users.

The abnormalities were equivalent to those caused by a mild traumatic brain injury or premature ageing.

Researchers found the men aged in their late-30s had the memory function of men in their mid-50s.

The amount of damage corresponded directly to the amount of cannabis smoked."

[http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/06/04/2264668.htm]

So marijuana is not as harmless as some had thought.

"Alcohol, cigarettes, cocaine and opiates kill thousands of people daily and are extremely addictive. These are not natural drugs and should be illegal. These drugs, and not marijuana create victims."

I agree that some of these drugs are much more addictive, meaning people are "hooked" faster, have more severe withdrawl symptoms and, in some cases, unbearable cravings. But I have personally seen people create crime to buy marijuana. I have seen people crave marijuana as much as cigarettes. Tobacco, alcohol, cocaine and opiates are all derived from plants. People who sell marijuana, or have the prepensity to abuse marijuana 9 times out of 10 break other laws, commit crimes against people and abuse other drugs. These actions create victims. Many people choose to buy marijuana instead of feeding their kids, and, really, any money spent on marijuana or any drug is money taken from the family.

"Drug laws should reflect the foundations of our society and the constitutional rights we have. Part of these rights are liberty (def. the condition in which an individual has the ability to act according to his or her own will). Liberty should be a right for everyone as long as that person doesn't infringe on the rights of others. Once a person's liberty infringes another persons liberty, it should be illegal."

As soon as someone commits a crime, or takes from those under their care such as family and children, they are infringing on the rights of others. I absolutely believe the government should step in at that point.

America was founded for religious freedom and to escape religious persecution, and I as well could be wrong. But I highly doubt America was founded so people could use drugs, and I doubt the founding fathers foresaw that. At the very least, marijuana and other drugs have an impact on society and our productivity. Imagine a world without drugs and addiction.

Now imagine a world where anyone could use any drug they wanted. Restricting the age, regulation and laws will not help in the case of legalization, as they do not help with cigarettes and alcohol. Addiction, for many, is not a choice, and marijuana for many, from my experience, is a start down that long, hard road.

Thanks for reading Andrew. I appreciate an educated response and it's a breath of fresh air reading your comment.

Great post It would be ridiculous to legalise drugs.great blog.